ARISE High School

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The MISSION of ARISE High School is to empower ourselves with the skills, knowledge, and agency to become highly educated, humanizing, critically conscious, intellectual, and reflective leaders in our community.

 

At ARISE we nurture, train, and discipline our school community to engage in a continuous practice of developing mind, heart, and body towards a VISION where we actively rise up. Agency and self-determination drive our struggle to improve our own material and social conditions towards a more healthy, equitable, and just society.

 

ARISE High School has been honored to serve the Oakland community for nearly 10 years and looks forward to continuing this service during our next charter term. The school was developed through a unique partnership with the Mills College School of Education, the Mills College TRIO Programs, Upward Bound, Oakland Community Organizations, and the Coalition of Essential Schools that sought to shift the discourse in urban education by challenging the traditional schooling model. Our founders, just as our staff today, believe that all children deserve a quality education that doesn’t replicate inequitable and oppressive institutions. Instead, we’ve developed a rigorous, high engagement, and authentic learning experience for our students.

 

Ultimately, the ARISE High School program is designed to support students to be agents of change - in control of their own lives and able to effect change in our community. Through active research over the past ten years, we have developed an Agents of Change Pathway that serves as a pipeline for our students to college and career opportunities when they graduate. In deep partnership with community organizations, students have multiple, transformative opportunities to explore a broad range of college and career opportunities. Through these experiences, students develop agency over their own college and career options as well as the ability to see themselves as agents of change within our community at large.

 

ARISE High School currently serves approximately 280 students in grades 9-12, and prepares students from low-income families to be the first to attend college.  Currently 96% of our students qualify for free and reduced lunch, 89% speak English as a Second Language, and 90% are first-generation college-bound. We are incredibly proud of our students’ successes.  Each year, we have had at least 85% of our graduates matriculate into 2- and 4- year colleges and universities.

 

  • At ARISE High School, we believe learning best occurs when a Relevant and Rigorous Curriculum is provided within a Collaborative School Culture. Core features of each of these components are as follows:

  • Relevant and Rigorous Curriculum - Utilizing two main methodologies, Understanding By Design and the Workshop Model, ARISE students are supported in practicing and applying academic skills and knowledge in a manner that:
    • Is aligned to state and national standards, utilizing standards-based grading
    • Allows for equitable, flexible, and individualized support for and engagement of all learners
    • Challenges each learner to think critically and creatively
    • Offers multiple opportunities to revise, reflect, and incorporate feedback in order to continuously improve their work
    • Constructs visible, active, and performance-based demonstrations of growth, learning, and understanding
    • Provides explicit modeling to support skill and academic development

    • Collaborative School Culture - The ARISE community fosters a collaborative school culture, to support students in their development through the following:
    • Students are explicitly taught and consistently challenged to work in a variety of constructs - from individual tasks and pairs to group projects and challenges - in order to grow, learn, and support one another to excel as scholars and a caring community of learners
    • Staff work in a highly collaborative and accountable manner to support our students, build/improve the curriculum, and identify areas of focus and growth for both adults and youth
    • Families consistently partner with ARISE to ensure and provide effective support, resources, and input that support continuous growth and improvement

    In addition, the following research-based pedagogical principles transcend both of these core areas:


    • Culturally Responsive - We believe culturally responsive teaching is not just about motivating disengaged students - it's about rebuilding trust with them through a learning partnership. It is that partnership that builds rapport and trust, in turn allowing educators to get permission from students to push them into their zone of proximal development. (Hammond, 2015)
    • Cognitive - We believe the most powerful learning comes from developing sophisticated understanding of concepts and higher order thinking associated with various fields of inquiry. (Bruner, 1966 & 1996;  Wiggins & McTighe, 2005)
    • Critical - We believe students should be taught how to think and be offered questions to think about. Through authentic dialogue, students develop an awareness of reality and bias which then helps them examine new possibilities. (Burbules, 1993; Cortez, 1986; Freire, 1996; Olsen, 1999; Shor, 1992; Wiggins & McTigh, 2005)
    • Reflective - We believe learners should be provided with ample opportunities to look back, to reflect, and to debrief about both what they know and don't yet know.  (Dewey, 1971; Doll, 1993; Freire,1996)
    • Standards-Based - We believe students' proficiency must be measured on well-defined course objectives. (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006)
    • Restorative - We believe that an implicit curriculum (Inlay, 2010) exists in schools, and that ARISE educators are culture builders who can support the school’s core values (Keinfeld, 1975; Ware, 2006; Hollie, 2011; Inlay, 2010; Claassen, 2008).  As well, we shift the paradigm of discipline from a focus on punishment to a focus “on responsibility, accountability, and a goal of restoration for all impacted by the offense.” (Claassen, 2008)
    • Appropriate - We believe effective intervention must include a process that can identify students by name and by need and then provide them with timely, directive, precise, and systematic support to keep them moving forward with their learning. (Dufour & Marzano, 2011)
    • Collaborative - We believe cooperative learning activities tap the social power of learning, especially for students learning a second language.  We understand that learning is socially constructed, and as such, students working together collaboratively in a variety of different groupings maximizes learning for all students regardless of their achievement levels. (Cummins, 1986; Lindholm-Leary, 2001; Lazarowitz & Karsenty; Slavin, 1994; Vygotsky, 1978, 1990)
    • Transformational - We believe students do not just receive knowledge, but create it within the cognitive systems they encounter. In doing so, they develop new ways to see and do things.  (Doll, 1993; Freire, 1996, Bruner,1966; Shor, 1992)   
    • Performative - We believe performance assessment - the opportunity to perform, create, or produce something with transferable real world application - taps into students’ higher order thinking skills. Researchers have found that the use of performance assessments can produce positive instructional changes in classrooms (Koretz et al., 1996; Matthews, 1995); increase student skill development (Spalding and Cummins, 1998); increase student engagement and post-secondary success (Foote, 2005); and strengthen complex conceptual understandings (Chung & Baker, 2003). Fundamentally, performance-based assessments Ruth Chung Wei, Raymond L. Pecheone, and Katherine L. Wilczak (December 2014) provide a means to assess higher order thinking skills while helping teachers and principals support students in developing a deeper understanding of content. (Vogler, 2002)
    • Data-Driven - We believe that to be effective, teachers must provide instruction within a child's zone of proximal development.  In order to provide this finely calibrated instruction, teachers must use a variety of assessments and informational sources to effectively target their instruction to meet the needs of the learner.  (Bruner, 1966 & 1996;  Piaget 1969; Jamentz, 1996; McTighe, 2005; Wiggins, 1998; Leahy, Lyon, Thompson, Wiliam, 2005)
    • Collegial - We believe students learn best when their teachers are engaged in continuous and collaborative reflection and professional learning.  (Boudett and Steele, 2005; Darling-Hammond, 1993; Nelson & Hammerman, 1996; McLaughlin & Oberman, 1996)
    • Familial - We believe students are successful when they are supported by caring adults, and when school and home work as partners to set high expectations for student behavior and achievement.  (Brandt, 1989;  Delgado-Gaitan, 1990)

    Our educational program structures are explicitly designed to support an ambitious and authentic vision of student achievement that encompasses both academic and socio-emotional outcomes.

9th

10th

11th

12th

Ethnic Studies

World Cultures

US History

Government

English 9

English 10

English 11

English 12

Algebra 1 or

Geometry

Geometry or

Algebra 2

Algebra 2 or

Pre-calculus/

Trigonometry

Pre-calculus/

Trigonometry, or

Calculus, or

College Math

Integrated Art 1

Integrated Science 1

Integrated Science 2

Science Electives: Chemistry,

Physics,

or Ecology

Integrated Science 3

Science Electives: Chemistry,

Physics,

or Ecology

Research Methods in Social Justice

Espanol Para Hispanos 3

(Spanish 3)

Leadership,

TA,

College Spanish,

Art,

Science Elective,

Concurrent College Enrollment Class, Credit Recovery, or Other Elective Based on Student Need

Leadership,

TA,

College Spanish,

Art,

Science Elective,

Concurrent College Enrollment Class, Credit Recovery, or Other Elective Based on Student Need